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My name is Susie Mauldin.  I have been an educator for 26 years.  This is my 5th year at R.S.I.S. I am passionate about reading, backpacking,  cooking, biking, and anything that has to do with the outdoors.  I love being a communication arts teacher because I truly believe that being a good  reader and writer makes us more successful in life.  I am excited about 
this school year and plan on trying my hardest to give your child the best education possible.

My 1:1 Pedagogy

I believe that students learn best when they are highly engaged in the learning process.  This

 means they are actively involved in building new ideas based on what they know and what they

 will need to know.  Students need to function in today’s technology driven world.  Without

 technology skills and the ability to collaborate locally or globally, they will be at a severe

 disadvantage when competing for future jobs.  Technology allows students to access the most

 current ideas and gives them the ability to manipulate and communicate those ideas in

 engaging ways.

 

My role is to ascertain the areas of growth for my students as individuals. Technology allows for

 this more individualized learning to occur.  I will need to cultivate an environment of highly

 engaged learners that know how to use technology to communicate and present their ideas to

 the appropriate audience.


 Students will need to feel that technology is as natural to them as breathing when it comes to

  communicating and collaborating with others.  Technology will be the tool for them to create,

 explore, and inquire into the world of knowledge, and then take that knowledge and build upon

 it and share with the world at large.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Recent Posts

10/10-10/14

Specific Learning Targets we will be establishing are the starting points of our goals in:

  
  1. Citing Evidence: Students review their first assessment using the skill of citing evidence. They will use their co-constructed success criteria to set goals in the mastery of this skill. The success criteria for this skill was co-created by teacher and students. It contains the steps or "I can..." statements to the understanding what it takes to complete this complex task we'll be assessing all year.  
  2. Text Structures: Introduction - Students will be learning to identify 5 text structures as a way to mastering the skill of summary. We will begin with "Descriptive" texts. Students must be able to identify the central idea and the way organizes the main ideas that support the central idea to be able to master the skill of writing an effective summary. 
  3. Test Taking Strategies will become part of our weekly lessons this week. Students must be able to use a number of strategies to become more successful in testing situations. 
  4. Notice and Note close reading strategy #2, the "Ah Ha, or Aha moment" will be introduced. Students will identify examples of Aha Moments in various mentor texts, and they'll take notes about the strategy in their Google Drive folder system. 
  5. Other daily activities will continue: Typing.com, Fluency Practice; Independent Reading; and Idiom-a-day. 
 
    
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will practice reading fluency at their ability level. 
  • Students will learn to read with comprehension to answer specific questions with evidence to support their claims. 
  • Students will learn to identify contrasts and contradictions in the characters of various pieces of literature. They will then identify why it is important to notice and note these characteristics. 
  • Students will begin to practice the skills of summarizing.
  • Students will begin to identify the the non-fiction text structure of description. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of their ability to cite evidence; students will set goals
  • Students will identify the central idea of descriptive texts and identify the main ideas the author uses to support the central idea present

10/3-10/7

Specific Learning Targets we will be establishing are the starting points of our goals in:

  
  1. Citing Evidence: Students review their first assessment using the skill of citing evidence. They will use their co-constructed success criteria to set goals in the mastery of this skill. The success criteria for this skill was co-created by teacher and students. It contains the steps or "I can..." statements to the understanding what it takes to complete this complex task we'll be assessing all year.  
  2. Text Structures: Introduction - Students will be learning to identify 5 text structures as a way to mastering the skill of summary. We will begin with "Descriptive" texts. Students must be able to identify the central idea and the way organizes the main ideas that support the central idea to be able to master the skill of writing an effective summary. 
  3. Test Taking Strategies will become part of our weekly lessons this week. Students must be able to use a number of strategies to become more successful in testing situations. 
  4. Other daily activities will continue: Typing.com, Fluency Practice; Independent Reading; and Idiom-a-day. 
 
    
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will practice reading fluency at their ability level. 
  • Students will learn to read with comprehension to answer specific questions with evidence to support their claims. 
  • Students will learn to identify contrasts and contradictions in the characters of various pieces of literature. They will then identify why it is important to notice and note these characteristics. 
  • Students will begin to practice the skills of summarizing.
  • Students will begin to identify the the non-fiction text structure of description. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of their ability to cite evidence; students will set goals
  • Students will identify the central idea of descriptive texts and identify the main ideas the author uses to support the central idea present

9/19-9/23

Specific Learning Targets we will be establishing are the starting points of our goals in:

  
  1. Citing Evidence: Students will be given the state standard and Co-Create the success criteria needed to master this important performance standard. Then they will write their first assignment. 
  2. Fluency: I will continue to determine the students fluency level by watching these first few passages at the level I feel is best.  I may have to modify the level once we start the first two to three weeks of passages. 
  3. Mastering High-Frequency words with 100% accuracy. 
 
    
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will practice reading fluency at their ability level. 
  • Students will learn to read with comprehension to answer specific questions with evidence to support their claims. 
  • Students will learn to identify contrasts and contradictions in the characters of various pieces of literature. They will then identify why it is important to notice and note these characteristics. 
  • Students will begin to practice the skills of summarizing.
  • Students will begin to identify the the non-fiction text structure of description. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of their ability to spell high frequency words between the grade levels of Kindergarten through 6th grade. Students will then create a personalized list words they must learn and identify as our districts "No Excuse" words: High-frequency words found in our language that must by spelled correctly in everyday writing. Spelling strategies and study methods will be taught. 
  • Students will co-create the skills necessary to write a claim and support and claim with evidence (citing evidence).  They will write their first constructed response using this success criteria. 

Overview of Learning Objectives

Specific Learning Targets we will be establishing are the starting points of our goals in:

  
  1.  Reading and Reading Comprehension diagnostics using i-Ready.com
  2. Citing Evidence: Students will be given the state standard and Co-Create the success criteria needed to master this important performance standard. Then they will write their first assignment. 
  3. Fluency: I will continue to determine the students fluency level by watching these first few passages at the level I feel is best.  I may have to modify the level once we start the first two to three weeks of passages. 
  4. Mastering High-Frequency words with 100% accuracy. 
 
    
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will identify a fluency level by reading a specific vocabulary quiz broken into grade level ability. 
  • Lexile Levels gathered from i-ready data will be given to students with the expectation they choose "Just Right Books" to improve reading comprehension and reading skill. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of their ability to spell high frequency words between the grade levels of Kindergarten through 6th grade. Students will then create a personalized list words they must learn and identify as our districts "No Excuse" words: High-frequency words found in our language that must by spelled correctly in everyday writing. Spelling strategies and study methods will be taught. 
  • Students will co-create the skills necessary to write a claim and support and claim with evidence (citing evidence).  They will write their first constructed response using this success criteria. 
The purpose of the pretest is to give each student a starting point, baseline, or level to move from over this school year. We work teach and use a "growth mindset" in our methods.

Note:
 More detailed information on various assignments are available through your student's Canvas account, then click on Communication Arts - 6th Grade Students for full access and review. 

Lessons for 4/18-4/22

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  1.  I can identify specific text features of non-fiction texts.
  2.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about author's purpose from the main ideas and then the central idea of a non-fiction text.
  3.  I can explain how the author’s purpose and author's point of view will result in the use of specific text features in non-fiction texts, and back-up that thinking with text evidence. 
  4. I can identify specific uses of figurative language and identify the tone within a fiction text. 
  
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will identify five types of text features used in non-fiction text samples. 
  • Students will identify the main idea in texts to gather the central idea or the author's purpose in a non-fiction text. 
  • Students will continue reading the final chapters 14 - 18 of "Bud, Not Buddy", focusing on the use of figurative language and how the author creates tone.
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify the main idea, text feature, and the author's purpose or central idea from a variety of non-fiction texts by completing a short questionnaire for a selected non-fiction text. 
  • Students will identify the claim of an author in a selected non-fiction text, using evidence to back up the claim the author makes and the thinking behind their choice. 
 

Lessons for 4/11-4/14

Lesson Plans 4/11 - 4-14 (Short Week)

 

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  1.  I can identify specific text features of non-fiction texts.
  2.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about author's purpose from the main ideas and then the central idea of a non-fiction text.
  3.  I can explain how the author’s purpose and author's point of view will result in the use of specific text features in non-fiction texts, and back-up that thinking with text evidence. 
  
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will identify five types of text features used in non-fiction text samples. 
  • Students will identify the main idea in texts to gather the central idea or the author's purpose in a non-fiction text. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify the main idea, text feature, and the author's purpose or central idea from a variety of non-fiction texts by completing a short questionnaire for a selected non-fiction text. 
  • Students will identify the claim of an author in a selected non-fiction text, using evidence to back up the claim the author makes and the thinking behind their choice. 

Lessons for 4/11-4/14

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  1.  I can identify specific text features of non-fiction texts.
  2.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about author's purpose from the main ideas and then the central idea of a non-fiction text.
  3.  I can explain how the author’s purpose and author's point of view will result in the use of specific text features in non-fiction texts, and back-up that thinking with text evidence. 
  
Reading Skill focus:  
  • Students will identify five types of text features used in non-fiction text samples. 
  • Students will identify the main idea in texts to gather the central idea or the author's purpose in a non-fiction text. 
Writing skill focus:
  • Students will identify the main idea, text feature, and the author's purpose or central idea from a variety of non-fiction texts by completing a short questionnaire for a selected non-fiction text. 
  • Students will identify the claim of an author in a selected non-fiction text, using evidence to back up the claim the author makes and the thinking behind their choice. 

Lessons for 3/28-4/1

Welcome Back Spring Breakers!
 

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  1.  I can identify and write evidence based claims they identify in the information text of Steve Jobs' Commencement Address of 2005. 
  2.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
  3.  I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
  4.  I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
 
  • Reading Skill focus:  
    • Students will identify claims made by Steve Jobs in his commencement address of 2005 at Stanford University.
    • Students will continue their practice of, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading Chapter 9 - 10 of a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
      • They will focus on particular words or phrases, identify evidence to support their ideas.
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice
      • They will look at supporting resources to learn and relearn the basic figures of speech: simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, idiom, onomatopoeia. There are others, but we will not focus on them this year. 
  • Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends  by writing inferences, and citing evidence to back-up their ideas found in the novel.
    • Students will write evidence based claims they have identified in the informational text of Steve Jobs' Commencement Address of 2005 at Stanford University. 

Lesson plans for 3/7-3/11

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  
  1.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
  2.  I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
  3. I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
  4. I can summarize and explain a theme from an excerpt of the novel, "Bud, Not Buddy".
 
  • Reading Skill focus:  
    • Students will finish annotating a speech from Steve Jobs in which he addresses the graduates of Stanford University in 2005. In this speech, Jobs discussed his "rules to live by". This will parallel the novel's "rules to live by".
    • We will identify text structures in the speech to help up identify the point of view of the author.
    • Students will continue their practice of, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading Chapter 8 of a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
      • They will focus on particular words or phrases, identify evidence to support their ideas.
      • We will map the Hooverville camp Bud finds himself at in Chapter 8 to help develop story imagery and meaning for the reader.
    • Students will continue to examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
      • They will record the rules Bud lives by identifying the gist of the rule and identifying possible reasons why the rule was created
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice
      • They will look at supporting resources to learn and relearn the basic figures of speech: simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, idiom, onomatopoeia. There are others, but we will not focus on them this year. 
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Remainder of the week - Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify and record rules people live by in both the speech and in the novel.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends  by writing inferences, and citing evidence to back-up their ideas found in both the speech and the novel.
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view in the novel, as well as the point of view of Steve Jobs.
 

Lesson 2/29-3/4

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:

  
  1.  I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
  2.  I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
  3. I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
  4. I can summarize and explain a theme from an excerpt of the novel, "Bud, Not Buddy".
 
  • Students will start their week with a Vocabulary  & Citing Evidence Assessment of Chapter 5, from the novel, "Bud, Not Buddy". 
  • Remainder of the week - Reading Skill focus:  
    • Students will read and annotate a speech from Steve Jobs in which he addresses the graduates of Stanford University in 2005. In this speech, Jobs discussed his "rules to live by". This will parallel the novel's "rules to live by".
    • Students will continue their practice of, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
      • They will focus on particular words or phrases, identify evidence to support their ideas.
    • Students will continue to examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
      • They will record the rules Bud lives by identifying the gist of the rule and identifying possible reasons why the rule was created
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice
      • They will look at supporting resources to learn and relearn the basic figures of speech: simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, idiom, onomatopoeia. There are others, but we will not focus on them this year. 
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Remainder of the week - Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify and record rules people live by.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends by writing inferences, and citing evidence to back-up their ideas. 
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view.
 

Lessons for 2/15-2/19

Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:
   I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
   I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
   I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
 
  • Students will start their week with a Pre-MAP test assessment as directed by the district. This assessment will take all of Monday, and partly Tuesday. It will afford my students the following skill practice:
    • Assessment familiarity, because is it similar to the MAP test they will take in May
    • Practice with test taking skills, best answer practice, and pacing
    • Reading short passages 
  • Remainder of the week - Reading Skill focus:  
    • Students will continue their practice of, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
      • They will focus on particular words or phrases, identify evidence to support their ideas.
    • Students will continue to examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
      • They will record the rules Bud lives by identifying the gist of the rule and identifying possible reasons why the rule was created
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice
      • They will look at supporting resources to learn and relearn the basic figures of speech: simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, idiom, onomatopoeia. There are others, but we will not focus on them this year. 
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Remainder of the week - Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify and record rules people live by.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends by writing inferences, and citing evidence to back-up their ideas. 
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view.

Overview for 2/8-2/12

Lesson Plans 2/8 - 2/12

 

  • Reading skill focus: 
    • Students will continue their new unit of study, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
    • Students will continue to examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify and record rules people live by.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view.
  • Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:
   I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
 
   I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
 
  I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.

Lessons for 2/1-2/5

  • Reading skill focus: 
    • Students will continue their new unit of study, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
    • Students will examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
    • We will continue to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice.
    • Students will present their vocabulary project focusing on word choice: Denotative and Connotative word meanings
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify rules people live by.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view.
  • Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:
     I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
 
    I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
 
     I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.

Lessons for 1/25-1/26

  • Reading skill focus: 
    • Students will begin a new unit of study, "Working with Evidence: Rules to Live By" while reading a favorite novel, Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.
    • Students will examine the rules particular individuals live by, and if those rules are survival type of rules, or thriving type of rules. 
    • We will begin to closely examine the use of figurative language in literature and how it affects tone and particular word choice.
    • Notice and Note: Examining how do authors use these clues to keep a reader interested.
  • Writing skill focus:
    • Students will identify rules people live by.
    • Students will identify figures of speech, specifically connotations, denotations delivering a specific tone the author intends
    • Students will identify the main character's point of view.
  • Specific Learning Targets we will focus upon this week:
 
 
    I can use evidence from the text to make inferences about Bud.
 
    I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.
 
 
    I can explain how the author’s word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
 

Lesson for 1/11-1/18

  • Anchor Project for Unit of Mythology 
  • Reading skill focus:
    • Students will reread information about the Greek myths to create a project of their choice. 
  • Writing skill focus: 
    • Students will write information to go along with their specific project. Each student understands that the most important part of their project is the writing component. The rest of it, art, props, performance, and presentation are secondary. 
  • All presentations start first thing TUESDAY, Jan 21st.